Generations

I have finalised, as of now, the archival record that connects me with my great, great grandfather, Samuel Ford.  The publication, Generations is now available for download.

This is the second of a series of books which I intend to publish through the internet as open source material.

Again the proviso is that the material is used for educational or family history purposes only and that it is not used for any commercial purpose.

I would also caution those who would like to add the material to one of the popular commercial ancestry websites.  I have not provided the material of my own research to such sites.

Blanks, Missing Records, and Other Defects ..

So what happens when the family researcher comes up with a blank, when the search engines return a ‘nil’ response?

The reaction can be unsettling to say the least.  But sometimes the way out is a simply email.  When I could not find a marriage certificate I finally contacted the national actives.  The result was welcome but also gives some insight why your best attempts to locate the missing data are not without good reason.

Read more here.

 

Why Immigrate to NZ

I have rewritten sections of James Ford: New Zealand page.

I have rethought several matters and tidied up a number of others.

The important addition to the research is the significance that the evangelism of the recently formed (1843) Free Church of Scotland had on a young James Ford.  The claustrophobic conditions created by the industrialisation of labour around the Glasgow area of Scotland could only have served the visionary gentlemen of the Free Church to promote far away places as places of refuge.

The Wright Inheritance

In writing a historical story one is continually confronted with the changing nature of the material accessed.  As a result of new information being accessed the story itself must change.  Following my recent purchase of the publication by J.R.D. Campbell, Clyde Coast Smuggling, I have found it necessary to review any number of historical facts concerning James Ford’s father, Samuel Ford.

The information provided by Campbell has alerted me to readjust the location of Margaret Ford’s residence at the time of the 1841 Census.  Not only have I had to rethink my previous assumptions, but the valuable information concerning the distribution of the ‘feu plan’ of 1781/2 confirms what I had hitherto suspected, that Samuel Ford’s marriage to Margaret Wright had important social and economic implications.

For instance, the fact that the ‘feu plan’ confirms that One Thomas Hunter was given a plot of land along Stuart Street which tallies with the record of the 1841 census where Hunter, now aged 79 is still in residence, supports my readjustment of the Ford’s residence on Stuart Street.

Further, Campbell’s publication confirms that the residence occupied by the now widowed Margaret Ford and her family was initially granted to Alexander Wright, grandfather of Margaret Ford.  Remembering that Margaret Ford’s father, Robert Wright was the son of Alexander Ford and a mariner on the revenue cutter the Royal George, it appears and is probably true, that Alexander Wright bequested the property to Samuel Ford on his marriage to his son’s sister, Margaret Wright.

Such benevolence would explain why an otherwise unknown quarry labourer came to be known a feuar, an owner of property in Millport.

The full details can be found on the page The Wright Inheritance.

Revision time

I am re-writing the life of James Ford; Island Footprints.

In The Story Behind the Story of Samuel Ford I have outlined my reasons for thinking James’ father, Samuel Ford came to Millport courtesy of the revenue cutter the Royal George.  Others may disagree and are free to reach their own conclusions about such matters.