Generations

I have finalised, as of now, the archival record that connects me with my great, great grandfather, Samuel Ford.  The publication, Generations is now available for download.

This is the second of a series of books which I intend to publish through the internet as open source material.

Again the proviso is that the material is used for educational or family history purposes only and that it is not used for any commercial purpose.

I would also caution those who would like to add the material to one of the popular commercial ancestry websites.  I have not provided the material of my own research to such sites.

A Ship Has Been Sighted: The Story of Samuel Ford

I have decided to publish the material I have collected over the previous fourteen years concerning the Ford/Wright genealogy.

As things turned out the Ford heritage is very much tied to Margaret Wright who married Samuel Ford on Cumbrae sometime in 1815.

The new addition to the site, including an appropriate change of name, is downloadable on the proviso that the material is used for educational or family history purposes only and that it is not used for any commercial purpose.

The Story of Samuel Ford may be found here.

Richard Cornish – update

I have been prowling the web and the genealogical sites related to Cornwall seeking more information about Richard Cornish. Richard Cornish immigrated from Cornwall arriving in Melbourne on the SS Norfolk in 1862.

Negotiating the local parish records and the English General Register Office is challenging to say the least.  However, I have gleaned some valuable information concerning Richard Cornish’s parents, Samuel Cornish and Elizabeth Rogers Carter and their parents.

I would like to thank the Penwith Genealogy and their forum site for providing valuable information. Their help is appreciated.

The quick link to the update may be found here.

 

Regular and Irregular Marriage, Scotland 1800s

In the 1800s marriage in Scotland was more than a ‘wedding,’ an institution that has now lost much of its historical or religious significance.

Accessing the ‘hard’ documentary data concerning births, deaths, and marriage records is one thing, but appreciating the economic and social circumstance under which those lives were lived is another.  As a result there were marriages which were both ‘regular’ and irregular’.

In my latest contribution I look at the marriage process that existed in Scotland in the early 1800s which you can jump to here.

For the record ..

Following my last article, There are Records and then there are Records, I have been contacted by a reader who quite legitimately questioned my rationale behind a statement I made with reference to the birth of Susanna Ford.

The point of concern was the fact that the source upon which I was relying, that is the birth certificate of Susanna Ford, was in fact a ‘collective’ record rather than an ‘individual’ record of Susanna’s birth.  The point being made, how can I assert that such record is correct given the number of years between those who appear on the collective record?  This is a thoughtful question and deserve a considered response particular given the subject matter of the previous article.

My latest article may be accessed here.